Data Journalism

Internews data journalism projects focus on revealing corruption and inequality and promoting accountability and data-driven policy decisions in countries ranging from Kenya to Afghanistan to Brazil in areas of health, elections, conflict, land rights and the environment.

There are vast amounts of data being made available around the world and Internews is leading efforts to grow open data communities.  We make sure journalists understand how to access, clean, analyze and transform data into information that informs local communities. The process includes using visualization tools including maps, charts and infographics to present the data in a way that helps communities understand how complex issues relate to their own lives.

Internews also recognizes that essential skills for high-impact data journalism include how to identify public interest story angles in data, scrutinize data sets for evidence of mismanagement and marginalization, and develop a strong narrative around data findings to ensure the public understands the human impact of the data findings and how government can solve the problem.

Key highlights of Internews’ approach include:

  • Inclusivity — bringing together everyone who has an interest in the data to work together, including journalists, civil society organizations, government officials, editors and technology experts.
  • Innovation — fostering creative solutions and collaboration through intensive workshops, hackathons, competitions, seed funding, awards and fellowships.
  • Data literacy — ensuring that audiences are able to understand and make more informed decisions based on data-driven storytelling.
  • Adaptability — recognizing that learning data skills is a long-term process that requires sustained training and institutional or community support to succeed.

Read more on Data Journalism from Internews in Kenya.

Internews is a member of the Global Investigative Journalism Network.

Global Investigative Journalism Network

Related Stories

  • Bubbles, Bars and Pictographs

    Monday, October 31, 2016

    A study conducted by Internews provided deeper insight into how Kenya’s news audiences perceive and understand the graphic images used to tell data-driven stories in the media. Bubble charts have little to no traction with Kenyan audiences; bar charts are generally considered more credible and “scientific;” but the best ones to use for conveying information are pictorial infographics.

    Read more

  • Bubbles, Bars and Pictographs: Understanding data and visual literacy in Kenya

    Monday, October 31, 2016

    (This story was originally posted on Medium.)

    Bubble charts have little to no traction with Kenyan audiences of print news. Bar charts, on the other hand, are generally considered more credible and “scientific.” But if you want interest and inferences drawn from the news you’re conveying, then the best ones to use are pictorial infographics.

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