• Reporting for Health in Kenya

    A woman and man sit in front of a sign - Third Global Forum on Human Resources for Health
    Friday, March 24, 2017

    Marie Yambo started as a weather girl at Kenya’s national broadcaster back in 2008.

    “There was an opening for a weather reporter; a few of us were trained.” This was not a glamorous position; at least not by the standards of Kenyan media. But Yambo jumped at the chance – she would be on television during prime time, and getting paid for it.

  • Bubbles, Bars and Pictographs

    Monday, October 31, 2016

    A study conducted by Internews provided deeper insight into how Kenya’s news audiences perceive and understand the graphic images used to tell data-driven stories in the media. Bubble charts have little to no traction with Kenyan audiences; bar charts are generally considered more credible and “scientific;” but the best ones to use for conveying information are pictorial infographics.

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  • Bubbles, Bars and Pictographs: Understanding data and visual literacy in Kenya

    Monday, October 31, 2016

    (This story was originally posted on Medium.)

    Bubble charts have little to no traction with Kenyan audiences of print news. Bar charts, on the other hand, are generally considered more credible and “scientific.” But if you want interest and inferences drawn from the news you’re conveying, then the best ones to use are pictorial infographics.

  • Data Journalism: The New Normal in Kenya

    Wednesday, June 22, 2016

    In Kenya, dedicated journalists like Dorothy Otieno are using data to give depth and integrity to mainstream reporting. Otieno heads up the team at Nation Newsplex which published analysis of data showing thousands of Kenyan children are still leaving school early, with long-term consequences – they earn less and suffer more ill health than their more qualified peers. She says:

  • Media Can Highlight Link Among Health Outcomes, Finance, and Governance

    Health Finance & Governance
    Friday, November 6, 2015

    (A kit developed by Internews in Kenya in collaboration with USAID's Health Finance & Governance Project is described in this article from HFG.)

    In many countries, the media has a potentially key role to play in advancing the health agenda. Journalists can shine a light on critical, but often underreported stories by connecting the dots for the public, civil society organizations, and decision-makers so they can fully understand health priorities and the funding and governance issues behind them.