• “We were all Slaves”

    Friday, November 4, 2016

    (This story was originally posted on Medium.)

    An investigative report by Burmese journalist Swe Win has revealed that abuses and exploitation are rife in Myanmar’s prison labor camps. Interviews with ex-prisoners and former prison officials document that convicts are forced to pay bribes or perform backbreaking manual labor, sometimes resulting in death.

  • “We were all Slaves”

    Friday, November 4, 2016

    An investigative report by Burmese journalist Swe Win has revealed that abuses and exploitation are rife in Myanmar’s prison labor camps. Interviews with ex-prisoners and former prison officials document that convicts are forced to pay bribes or perform backbreaking manual labor, sometimes resulting in death. 

    Read more

  • Combatting Online Hate Speech in Myanmar

    Monday, October 24, 2016

    (This story was originally posted on Medium.)

    They noticed the signboard as soon as they arrived at the village of Kone Thar. The message seemed clear enough: “No Muslims allowed in this village!”

  • Combatting Online Hate Speech in Myanmar

    Monday, October 24, 2016

    Journalism trainers, Hsu Hsu and Hein, went to Kone Thar in Myanmar to lead a “Safe Online Space” training organized by Myanmar ICT for Development Organization. When they spoke about how social media can either be used to mobilize communities for peace, or to stir up conflicts through dangerous speech and spreading online rumors, it triggered an open conversation. 

  • Farmers Find Happy Listening in the Golden Land

    Image for Farmers Find Happy Listening in the Golden Land
    Thursday, September 8, 2016

    A young farmer – in flip flops, short sleeves, with his face uncovered – is spraying his crops with insecticide. Suddenly, in the next field over, he sees another farmer covered from head-to-toe in protective gear, and realizes that he is exposing himself to dangerous chemicals. Inspired, he dons close-toed shoes, long sleeves, gloves, and a facemask: lesson learned. 

  • Data Journalism Should Thrive on Cross-Border Collaborations—Why Doesn’t It?

    Source
    Friday, February 19, 2016

    (Eva Constantaras, Internews Data Journalism Advisor, wrote this article for Source.)

    I was sitting in a Yangon tech hub on the first day of a two-week election data war room, with a bunch of Myanmar journalists still riding the high of the recent election. Aung San Suu Kyi was going to lead the country at last. Yangon was crawling with foreign correspondents—and there were more than 300 brand new media outlets in Myanmar, none of which were on very firm financial footing.

  • Seng Mai, Myanmar: Local Journalism Against All Odds

    Wednesday, February 17, 2016

    (This story was originally posted on Medium.)

    Seng Mai is the publisher and editor-in-chief of Myitkyina Journal, the only independent paper in Kachin State. She is the only women editor-in-chief in Myanmar.

  • For the World’s Daughters To See

    Friday, January 15, 2016

    Chime for Change, a global platform for supporting women’s voices, invited us to contribute two videos about remarkable women we work with who are courageously working in media in very difficult situations – Myanmar, South Sudan and Ukraine.

    When the world consumes media – online or traditional – only 10% of all stories they see, hear or read feature women.

    We believe that women's inclusion and participation in media and information is critical to helping our daughters see the range of their possibilities in life.

  • For the World’s Daughters To See

    Chime for Change - Founded by Gucci
    Tuesday, January 5, 2016

    (This article from Chime for Change was written by Internews President & CEO Jeanne Bourgault.)

    Anne Marie Slaughter, a US foreign policy expert, once said that when John Kerry was nominated as US Secretary State in 2013, her son asked her: “mom, how can a man be a Secretary?” For the previous eight years, two women had held the high-profile position. To me, the boy’s astonishment captures the influence of public role models in shaping a child’s perspectives on life and what can be done.