Tunisia's multiplying media

Media outlets have multiplied in post-Ben Ali Tunisia, but with this plurality has come a whole new set of problems.

This Al Jazeera Listening Post episode on media freedom in Tunisia includes an interview with Jamal Dajani, Internews VP for the Middle East & North Africa.

On Listening Post this week: Tunisia hosts World Press Freedom Day but can it host press freedom?

A year and a half ago, few would have thought that Tunisia would be the host of the United Nation's annual Press Freedom Day. But a lot has changed since the self-immolation of Mohamed Bouazizi - an act that sparked a revolt across North Africa and the Arab world. In post-Ben Ali Tunisia, the handful of media outlets that once served the dictator have multiplied into more than 100 outlets across print, radio, television and the web. However, with this plurality has come a new set of problems, as the factional struggles within the country manifest in the media. Our News Divide this week looks at how the media is caught in the middle of the fight for political power in Tunisia.

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