New Website Launches Vital Debate on Saving Asia’s Rivers

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thethirdpole.net 

thethirdpole.net, a project of chinadialogue.net, today launches a new, standalone platform that will showcase its unique blend of reportage, discussion and analysis of climate impacts and environmental change in the river systems and watersheds of the Himalayas.

Since its launch four years ago, thethirdpole.net has established itself as the benchmark platform for the distribution of regional news and information on Asia’s vital river systems, transboundary water tensions, the Himalayan cryosphere, the Qinghai-Tibet plateau and the impact of infrastructure projects on the region’s environmental security.

 “With the launch of this new website, thethirdpole.net is carving out its own identity,” said Joydeep Gupta, South Asia editor.   “Watch this space for exciting developments.”

The project is named for the importance of the Himalayas as the world’s third largest store of frozen fresh water.  Some 1.3 billion people depend on these waters in the rivers that flow from the world’s tallest mountain range. Now they are threatened by climate change, deforestation, pollution and ill-planned infrastructure projects.  Protecting these vital ecosystems will require a new spirit of cooperation in the region.  

Recognising that trust and confidence building begin with reliable, shared information, thethirdpole.net offers timely, balanced and accurate news and analysis, to foster open communication between all stakeholders and to encourage a regional perspective on sustainable development, adaptation and ecosystem protection.

“The third pole sits at the heart of Asia and is the world’s biggest and most critical set of interrelated ecosystems,” said Isabel Hilton, editor of thethirdpole.net.  “Today this huge, diverse and strategically vital region is facing uncertainties over water supplies, the future of the monsoon and the effects of warming on mountain glaciers.  The whole region is facing great uncertainty and everyone from the policymakers in government to the small mountain farmer needs reliable and balanced coverage of these complex issues. Rivers do not stop at national boundaries:  if we want to avoid conflict, we need a shared perspective.”

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