eJournal USA: Cultivating Civil Society 2.0

This issue of eJournal USA explores the evolving intersection between civil society and technology and offers examples of how civil society organizations are exploiting technology’s potential to give a voice to the voiceless and homes to the homeless.

eJournal USA: Cultivating Civil Society 2.0
Author(s):
U.S. Department of State / Bureau of International Information Programs

(Page 41 of the report summarizes Internews' Cyber Car of Friendship project in Kyrgyzstan)

Civil society consists of organizations and institutions that help and look after people, their health and their rights. The work of civil society groups complements the efforts of governments and the private sector. Whether the goal is as local as building a new school or as global as stemming the spread of HIV/AIDS, civil society is a vital player and essential partner.

As more and more people around the world have gained access to computers, phones and other mobile communications devices, civil society organizations have kept pace. Civil society is pioneering the use of so-called “connection technologies” (for example, mobile phones, mapping applications and social-networking software) to improve health, promote transparency, advance human rights and uphold justice. Connection technologies are limited only by the ingenuity of their users. Increasingly, civil society groups are using technology in unprecedented ways to carry out their work and expand the sphere in which they operate.

This issue of eJournal USA explores the evolving intersection between civil society and technology and offers examples of how civil society organizations are exploiting technology’s potential to give a voice to the voiceless and homes to the homeless.

Download the report

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