SaferJourno: Digital Security Resources for Media Trainers

Cover: SaferJourno
Author(s):
Manisha Aryal and Dylan Jones

SaferJourno is a free and open-source curriculum guide for media trainers who teach students, professionals and peers digital safety and online security. Easy to use lesson plans are in six different modules; assessing risks, basic protection, mobile phone safety, keeping data safe, researching securely, and protecting email.

The toolkit starts with a trainer’s guide, which walks journalism and media trainers through adult teaching and learning approaches. The guide aims to make the teaching of these sometimes complex issues to busy professionals, easier to navigate.

The curriculum for the toolkit was created by Internews with experts from the increasingly overlapping fields of journalism and cybersafety and in response to requests from colleagues and friends around the world looking for ways to more effectively teach and share these critically important skills. The toolkit was field-tested in Nairobi, Kenya and peer-reviewed by leading experts in the digital security and journalism fields. It aims to help journalists, and the trainers and educators who work with them, integrate the fundamentals of digital safety into their craft and daily practice of journalism.

Download the toolkit, SaferJourno

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