Haiti

After the January 12, 2010 earthquake, Internews put together a team to assist local radio stations to continue broadcasting news and information, which was critical in the aftermath of the devastation. On January 21, the team began producing Enfòmasyon Nou Dwe Konnon (News You Can Use), a humanitarian radio program that provides vital information to Haitians. Since then, Internews has also been training local journalists in humanitarian reporting. The Caribbean nation became a real-world laboratory for new communication tools as relief workers used innovative technologies to aid in the recovery. Interactive maps and SMS (Short Message Service) texts helped guide search-and-rescue teams and find people in need of critical supplies.

See a a 2012 review of Internews’ humanitarian information radio program: Closing the Loop — Responding to People’s Information Needs from Crisis Response to Recovery to Development

Related Stories

  • Profile: Ralph Thomassaint, Haiti

    Ralph Thomassaint stands next to a poster reading "PRIX Philippe Chaffanjon
    Tuesday, April 8, 2014

    Ralph Thomassaint, a 27 year old Haitian journalist trained by Internews, won the Prix Philippe Chaffanjon for multimedia reporting.  This yearly award, named after a recently deceased Deputy Director of the French Public Broadcasting group Radio France, awards prizes for two reports from the field, one released on a media outlet in France and the other from Haiti. Watch Rhomassaint’s award-winning piece.

  • The Messenger Matters

    The Messenger Matters
    Monday, August 19, 2013

    (Internews' humanitarian information program is covered in an article in This Monthly Developments Magazine.)

    When the Haiti earthquake struck in 2010, local radio broadcasting in Creole quickly alerted a disoriented population to safety measures and available aid. This helped get important information to many illiterate Haitians, who account for roughly half of the population. Most importantly, the lifesaving reports came from trusted local voices: Haitian journalists.