Internews Maps the Media Landscape in Afghanistan

Internews Maps the Media Landscape in Afghanistan
Thursday, May 31, 2012

In a country where only 9 percent of the population has access to the Internet and more than half never uses a television, it's critical for journalists and organizations supporting the media to understand how people get news and other information. As part of its efforts to support independent journalism in Afghanistan, Internews mapped the results of a recent media research survey to tell the story of where people tune in for news.

Interactive Mapping Project in the Amazon Region Begins

Journalist photographs a tree in the Amazon
Monday, February 27, 2012

This project will create an interactive map of the Amazon basin that contains layers of information combining satellite images, news, information and multi-media reports about climate and development from both professional and citizen journalists.

Journalists based in the Amazon region, including those in the new Pan-Amazon Communicators network, will produce stories on climate, forestry and development issues and will upload GPS-tagged stories to the platform.

Visualizing Media in Afghanistan

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Extensive research into the use of media and access to communication technologies in Afghanistan can be visually explored through a new web site, which maps the most comprehensive survey of media access in the country to date.

Map: Media Landscape in Afghanistan

Visualizing violence

Visualizing violence
Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Afghanistan is one of the most dangerous places in the world for journalists. Hostile conditions for journalists not only limit media freedom, they also threaten international development efforts and the strength of civil society in general. Together with Internews, an international media development organization, we at Development Seed mapped the conditions on the ground that journalists face in an effort to highlight the issue and better inform journalists on the situation in Afghanistan.

Mapping Violence Against Journalists in Afghanistan

Mapping Violence Against Journalists in Afghanistan
Monday, August 1, 2011

Last week, Ahmed Omed Khpulwak, a 25-year old stringer for the BBC, was killed in a suicide bomb attack in southern Afghanistan. Khpulwak’s death, as the many that came before it, is a tragedy and a reminder of the violence and danger journalists covering Afghanistan routinely face. There have been 266 reported incidents of violence against journalists covering the country—and Khpulwak was the 22nd journalist to have died there—since the war began in 2001, according to Nai, an Afghan media advocacy and education organization.

Afghanistan: Mapping Ten Years of Living Dangerously

Afghanistan: Mapping Ten Years of Living Dangerously
Monday, August 1, 2011

The interactive map -- which highlights cases of harassment, beatings, kidnappings and other dangers, including murder – was just released by Nai, a media development organization based in Kabul. Nai collected the data on the 266 security incidents recorded (so far).